Fun Facts on West Indies Cricket Grounds🕵️‍♀️🤷‍♀️

For many West Indians young and old their favourite enjoyment in sport is that of cricket. Around the region on many of our cricketing grounds, we see bat having a grand meeting with ball, spectators anxiously awaiting the outcome of the match while so gyrating to sounds of pulsating calypso or reggae music depending on the island the match is been played. Not to be outdone are our cricketers regional and international strutting out of their respective dressings rooms to face each other, while exciting the crowd with spectacular stroke play being brought about by a proper yorker being bowled by the bowler. The Caribbean is considered the best place to be to watch and play cricket due to excitement which takes place around the many cricketing grounds in the region.

Traveling in London

1.   There are 12 cricketing grounds within the region where Test, ODI(One Day International) T20 are played

2.   Guyana along with Antiguan and Barbuda is the only Caribbean Islands to have two international cricketing stadiums Bourda in Georgetown Guyana Providence Stadium in Providence, Antigua Recreation Ground in St. John’s and Sir Vivan Richards Stadium in North Sound.

3.  The Kensington Oval in Barbados is the largest cricketing ground which has the capacity to hold 28,000 spectators on any given day.

4.  The most Test matches have been played at Queens Park Oval in Trinidad (60).

5. The least Test matches have been played at Providence Stadium in Guyana (2).

6. The most One Day International (ODI) has been played at Queens Park Oval in Trinidad (4).

7.  The least One Day International (ODI) has been played at Windsor Park in Dominica (4)

8. The most T20 matches have been played at Kensington Oval in Barbados (17)

9. The least T20 matches have been played at Arnos Vale Stadium in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Windsor Park in Dominica (2) each.

10.  In terms of balls bowled, the shortest is the first Test between the West Indies and England at Sabina Park, Jamaica on 29 Jan 1998. Only 10.1 overs were bowled in 56 minutes and England scored 17-3. The match was abandoned as the pitch was deemed to be too dangerous to continue.

11. Of the top 25 best cricketing pitches in the world, Kensington Oval in Barbados is ranked 17 while Queens Park Oval in Trinidad is ranked 11 respectively.

12. Since 2006 ICC has introduced it’s pitch monitoring process. 14 international pitches have been rated poor or worse by match referees. Nine of the 14 pitches have belonged to ICC full members.  The pitch in St. Kitts is one which is rated poorly by ICC.

West Indies v South Africa, Test, St Kitts, 2010

Rating: Poor
Reason: Too flat
Match referee: Jeff Crowe

The ICC noted that “it was remnants of a T20 pitch from a few weeks ago”.

13.  Kensington Oval, Queen’s Park Oval, Bourda, Sabina Park were first used in 1930.

14.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oh03Hv4Q_yw

15.  Sir Curtly Ambrose holds the record for the most wickets taken at the Queen’s Park Oval, (66).

16.  In 1948, leg-spinner Wilfred Ferguson became the first West Indian bowler to take 10 wickets in a Test, finishing with 11/229 in a match against England at the Queens Park Oval.

17.  Kensington Oval hosted the region’s first Test match on 11 January 1930 and is recognised as the ‘Mecca’ of West Indies cricket.

18.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBsfkSZmaeA

19. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMs22h6GaLo

20.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfnybA11XuQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ir8h4ZFIUNA&t=99s&index=3&list=WL

 

Advertisements

2 Comments Add yours

  1. fashfitwoman says:

    My dad loved cricket and he always spoke about Queens Park Oval and that name is stuck in my head. It just has a nice ring to it.

    Like

    1. Glad your dad shared some of his knowledge of the sport with you along with the various cricketing stadium we have in the Caribbean. please make it your point of due to follow my blogpost and also my Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Nubienqueenb76/

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s